Bullitt-in

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Ford continues to live up to its pledge to do something interesting with the Mustang every 12 to 18 months with the introduction of the the Bullitt version of the Mustang.

The new version, which will start at just over $31,000 U.S., holds true to the original movie version: understated, but masculinely ominous in hunter green with charcoal wheels and absolutely no badging anywhere on the exterior of the car. In fact, the color on the original was called highland green and this version is called dark highland green.

The interior is all charcoal and features the only real badging on the vehicle: a Bullitt logo on the steering wheel and a couple of subtle logos in other places.

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It’s said that the chase scene from the 1968 movie spawned the long-standing popularity of the car chase in movies, and Ford’s President of the Americas Mark Fields said watching the movie as a 7-year-old ignited his passion for cars. One could argue between the Bullitt and a white Bronco from a few years ago, Ford is tied to the two most famous chase scenes in history!

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The 2008 version is actually the second tribute to the original. Ford launched a specially modified Mustang GT in 2001 after receiving overwhelming positive response from consumers who saw the concept version at the 2000 Los Angeles International Auto Show.

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More than 3,000 Bullitt Club members link up on the forum pages of the International Mustang Bullitt Owner’s Club web site. The site’s registry lists 2,428 Bullitt Mustangs and represents owners from all 50 United States and several other countries.

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The club will get the chance to add as many as 7,700 more members as that’s how many of new versions Ford plans to produce in the U.S. and Canada. Of course, the Bullitts will be serialized…Ford wants to ensure these vehicles are special.

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“We want these cars to have an air of collectibility about them,” said Fields during the preview of the car in Dearborn, Mich. The public will get its first look at the vehicle during the Los Angeles Auto Show later this month.

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The last specially modified Mustang available to the public was last year’s Shelby GT 500, which met with similar enthusiast response: they sold out.

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The original Bullitt was a 390hp ’68 that raced around the streets of San Francisco and the 2008 version lives up to the heritage, boasting 315hp @ 6000 rpm and 325 ft lbs of torque at 4250 rpm. The redline has been boosted by 250 rpm to 6,500, with top-end speed bumped to 151 miles-per-hour. Gears are selected via a Tremac 5-speed manual transmission, and the shifter is topped with a polished aluminum shift ball designed just for the ’08 Bullitt.

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The company also borrowed heavily from Ford’s racing portfolio to beef up the car’s performance characteristics. Bullitt wears unique cast-aluminum Euroflange wheels, offering a modern twist on the original movie car. The Dark Argent Gray spokes feature a satin finish, while a pight-machined lip completes the look. Calipers are colored to match the wheel. The wheels are wrapped in the same P235/50ZR 18 BF Goodrich g-Force T/A KDWS tires used on Mustangs at the Ford Racing High Performance Driving School at Miller Motorsports Park in Utah.

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Comments

  1. says

    I love the idea of no badging and this that the car look slick. In fact with less branding it makes people more curious to find out about the truck.

    I got this a lot with my Xterra which at the time was heavily modded and most of the obvious branding was hidden or removed.

  2. Mike Strong says

    I like the fact that they keep looking for ways to make the Mustang relevant. I have a 7-year-old who wants nothing more than to see Daddy get a Mustang GT convertible…and he likes this one too.

  3. Mike Strong says

    It’s unbelievable. I’ve loved them since I was a child, but my Dad worked for Ford so it’s understandable…but the boy (and the 5-year-old daughter) just loves them! That said…you are one lucky bugger!

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